Thursday, December 11, 2014

WPN events Dec, Jan

WPN December Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 2,9,16,30. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 5,12. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. DCI sanctioned. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 19th. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Here, you rule. Modern constructed event. This format includes cards from 8th edition and Mirrodin block forward. $10.00 Entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 26th. 5:30pm.

    Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 3,10,17,31; 6-9pm.


WPN January Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 6,13,20,27; 5:00-9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry.
    Fridays: 2,9,30; 5:30pm - 9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Modern is a non-rotating format containing all cards from the 8th edition core set to current sets. It is quite diverse and interesting. $10.00 entry. Prizes can be claimed as singles.
    Friday: 16; 5:30-9:00pm.

    Fate Reforged Pre-release!: Once again NDC is proud to host an officially sanctioned prerelease event for the Fate Reforged set. Free Giveaways in each event. Also intro packs will be available for open gaming ($15.00).
    Saturday 17; 11am registration; Play 12noon. $30.00 sealed deck.
    Saturday 17; 4pm registration; Play 5pm. $30.00 sealed deck.
    Sunday, 18; 11:30am registration; Play 12:15; $30.00 Two-headed giant sealed deck.

    Friday Night Magic-Draft: Here, you rule. This is a launch event for Fate Reforged. $16.00 entry.
     Friday: 23; 5:30-9:00pm

Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 7,14,21,28; 6-9pm.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

SCGIQ - Tarentum; Head Judge Report

Star City Games IQ – Tarentum
Head Judge Tournament Report
Competitive; Standard

    For this particular event, I found myself wearing many hats. I was Judge Manager, and responsible for securing staff for the event. I was Head Judge, responsible for identifying tasks and goals, and delegating responsibilities. I was Scorekeeper, and had to keep track of the event as it progressed. I'm going to discuss various aspects of all of these roles.

    Cast:
Tournament Organizer: Jonathan Engel
Head Judge / Scorekeeper: Dan Regewitz (myself)
Floor Judge: Christopher Hartman
Floor Judge: Chelsea Hogan
55 awesome players.

= Preparation

    I originally lined up this event with Jon after I had just completed a 50 player GPT with myself as the only judge. As that event was a little stressful for me personally I knew this event, we were going to need at least one other judge. Fortunately, we had a lot of time to consider what we needed to do and how for the event, as it took some time to get permission to run the event from the owner (this was the company's first SCG-IQ), as well as order and receive the tournament kit.

    So as Judge manager, I created an event on Judge apps, made a call out for other judges, and had to turn at least one judge away entirely. This was all new to me, as I had never formally acted as a judge manager for a multi-judge event before. I knew that I needed some judges. As our planning continued, it became clear that my tournament role would mostly likely be scorekeeper AND head judge. So, I knew not to count myself for 'floor coverage'. Our estimated attendance was 30-60 players, which we did hit. So our target was 2 floor judges, with a third possibly on standby in case something crazy happened.

    Overall I prepared well, even making notes for myself on what to cover in the pre-event judge meeting, and player meeting. I also took some steps that were clearly over-preparing. For example, I packed my own laptop and printer to the event – again just in case something catastrophic occurred.

= Score keeping

    My experiences as Scorekeeper are perhaps the least exciting. As a local judge and TO, I have had close to 5 years of experience working with tournament software (first DCIR, now WER), and was fairly confident that I could score keep a competitive REL event. I vaguely recall a few moments where things were a little hectic, however barring a hiccup or two, the day was without severe incident.

    Christopher showed me the wondrous multiprint feature, which I had not had the opportunity to use previously, and that certainly made things go smoothly.

    I in turn, was able to show him the WER fixed seating workaround. For those unfamiliar with this, WER does not have a function where you can fix a player to a certain table number. However, you sometimes want to do this to make the day easier for people with crutches, or a cane, etc. The workaround involves pairing all matches randomly, finding the player whose seat you want to fix, and unpairing them. Then, you find and unpair the table you want to fix them to. Then you repair the 4 players correctly, in table order.

    The only other scorekeeper note I have for this event, is one match where the players finished game 2 in turns, and were 1/1, but the slip was filled out 1/1/1. So in this case, no third game was played, and I took the liberty to fix the slip after clarifying the situation with Chelsea.
   
= Head Judge

    As an experienced lv1, I have had my turn at being Head Judge in various situations. However, as luck or providence would have it, this was my first event as Head Judge where other judges were under my direction. This changes the focus of what I need to do and think about in terms of the event. In context, being head judge in such a situation is a lot more about defining tasks, giving instructions, and delegating responsibility.

    In terms of defining tasks: It's pretty easy to identify the various pieces that go into running a successful event. The timely posting of pairings, the distribution of match-slips near the beginning of round, Deck checks, and the coverage of the floor throughout the event. It is quite another thing to meld these items into a cohesive whole. I found it helpful to imagine things as they would occur in an actual tournament environment, come up with a proper sequence, try to think about potential snag-points, and modify accordingly. Lastly, although you have this wonderful plan, don't be afraid to modify it based on what is actually going on in the live event.

    Just as an example, I announced the start of the round, but was having difficulties projecting properly on the day. Thus some players had started their match and some had not. Chris re-announced the start of round more robustly, but because of the confusion included we skipped the beginning of round deck check for that round, pulling a mid-round instead.

    Giving Instructions: So as head judge I had two sets of notes. One was information I was going to go over with the judges at our judge meeting. This largely included the tasks that identified, and the way in which I imagined them being executed. The other set of notes was for the player meeting, and included information for them: please check your deck lists for errors, what competitive REL means, and so forth. The point is that communication is a big piece of being head judge.

    There are two instances where my communication to the players broke down a bit. The first is I simply had issues projecting. This is an issue I had throughout the day, though my end-of-round announcements went smoothly. I am simply accustomed to being a quiet speaker, and need more practice making these sorts of announcements.

    I had planned to make an announcement going into the final rounds of the event with an instruction that players should be playing magic, or shaking hands, and not improperly determining winner, or attempting bribery. This announcement was unintentionally skipped due to other issues that had to be dealt with – a direct result of my multiple tournament roles.

= Other notes

    On the day, I was called in on an appeal twice. The first case involved a player who called judge upon discovering their opponent counting 59 card main deck, 16 card sideboard, in between games 1 and 2. Christopher was the responding judge. It was his ruling that as we are currently between games, no penalty is issued. This ruling was upheld.

    The other case involved Player N cast Magma Jet targeting Prognostic Sphinx. Player A discarded a card to give the Sphinx Hexproof. Chelsea was the responding judge. It was her ruling that the spell will resolve and do as much as possible, allowing Player N to scry 2. This was overturned. As Magma jet goes to resolve, we check to see if the target is legal, and it is not because of hexproof. As a result the spell is countered by the game rules and none of it's effects occur (CR 602.8b).

    A small hiccup occurred in logistics. A player asked me as were entering round 4 (of 6) if standings had been posted at all. They had not, and I did want to post standings at the end of round 3, as that was the half-way point for the event. I thanked the player and made a note to post standings end of round 4. Standings were posted, but then I quickly forgot to pair round 5 before printing pairings and match-slips. This resulted in duplicate pairings, which we had to quickly retract. Fortunately I caught the error quickly.

   

Thursday, November 6, 2014

WPN events Nov - Dec

WPN November Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 4,11,18,25. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 7,14. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. DCI sanctioned. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 21st. 5:30-9pm

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Here, you rule. Modern constructed event. This format includes cards from 8th edition and Mirrodin block forward. $10.00 Entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 28th. 5:30-9:00pm

    Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.

Expeditions: Continue to adventure. For Characters lv5+.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.

WPN December Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 2,9,16,30. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 5,12. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. DCI sanctioned. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 19th. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Here, you rule. Modern constructed event. This format includes cards from 8th edition and Mirrodin block forward. $10.00 Entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 26th. 5:30pm.

    Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 3,10,17,31; 6-9pm.

Monday, October 27, 2014

TCG Player Diamond (Columbus)

TCG Player Diamond (Columbus) Event Report
by Dan Regewitz Lv1 – Floor Judge (Deck Checks Team)

Cast:
Jarrod Williams Lv2 - Judge Manager
David Rappaport LV3 - Head Judge
Ryan Seymore UC - TO
Anthony Bucchioni Lv2 - Deck Checks Team Lead (mine)

    Reflecting on this past weekend, we had a pretty good event. 160 players were managed into a relatively smooth 8 rounds. The deck-check team, on which I served, checked 24 decks – before even the top 8 gathered. I'd like to do something a bit different with this judge article, and that is first, I'd like to retread some information about deckchecks, what they are and how we do them. Retread because I've covered this topic before as part of my tournament report for SCG open – Pittsburgh July 2011 (check the archives of my articles, it's in there).

    Deck checks

    So as part of my duties for this event, I was on the deck-checks team, and as luck would have it I remained on this team as was not pulled away from other duties as the day went on. Deck checks are a feature of nearly every major competitive magic event in modern memory. It is a task that we, as judges are expected to perform, and a task that requires some skill. Certainly there is learning involved as a judge may become faster or more efficient at this task.

    We perform deck checks primarily to ensure the integrity of the event. The deck list is a record of what deck any given player is playing in that event. Errors in said deck list can result in a potential for advantage when cards are registered incorrectly – or not at all.

    The Magic Tournament Rules (2.8) outline the expectations of what a deck check entails for players. The Infraction Procedure Guide (3.5) outlines the penalties for an improperly registered deck.

    However, there are many ins-and-outs of how to perform a deck check that are not recorded, except in judge articles. Performing a deck-check is largely a learn-by-doing exercise for judge canidates and new judges, and I will not attempt to cover everything that goes into the process. But here's a little of what to expect.

    There are essentially 2 types of deck checks. Targeted, and random. Random deck checks are just like they sound. A table # is generated at random, often by the scorekeeper, and the deck check team will swoop (slang for moving in and getting the decks at the right moment without alerting the players) the table.

    A targeted deck check occurs, when we encounter a potential error when checking the lists. This could be an unreadable card name or number, an abbreviated card name, a list without a name, or other minor clerical error. Often we investigate these issues by taking a look at the actual deck that the player is running. More often than not we make a note on the deck list as to the actual contents of the deck being run, and issue a penalty if we deem it necessary.

    The last time I discussed some of the details that go into actually swooping the decks, so this time around I'd like to cover the things that we look for when we check a deck for errors.

    The IPG specifically calls out the the following problems that could result in a deck-decklist error.
    The deck or decklist contains an illegal number of cards for the format.
    The deck or decklist contains one or more cards that are illegal for the format.
    A card listed on a decklist is not identified by its full name, and could be interepreted as more than one card. Truncated names of storyline characters (legendary permanents, planeswalkers) are acceptable as long as they are the only representation of that character in the format and are treated as referring to that card, even if other cards begin with the same name.
    The contents of the presented deck and sideboard do not match the decklist registered.

    We check for these things largely by sorting out the deck we obtained from the player, and comparing it to the list submitted at the start of the event.

    However it is important to note that these are not the only things that a member of the deck-check team may look for. Sometimes we also have to consider the possibility of marked cards. In a large event it is entirely possible for sleeves that are not marked to become somewhat marked during the event in the process of shuffling, cutting, playing, and otherwise manipulating cards. So a glance is usually given to sleeves to determine what kind of wear they have seen, and if a pattern can be determined.

    Scorekeeping 101
    Two interesting match results came to my attention during this tournament. Kudos to Lv2 Patrick Nelson.

    In one case, A player was seated and was waiting for his opponent to show up. The player meeting for the TCG-gold modern side event was announced, and the player wanted to go play modern. This resulted in a match where the player conceded to a no-show opponent, and then dropped to attend the other event. In the end we reported the match, and simply dropped both players.

    In another case, we had a table with a match slip and no players seated. That's right a double-tardiness match loss. In the end we reported this match as 0-0, and simply dropped both players.

    Missing Triggers
    Player A cast a Fiendslayer Paladin, while Player N has an Eidolon of the Great Revel on the battlefield. Eidolon reads in part “Whenever a player casts a spell with converted mana cost 3 or less, Eidolon of the Great Revel deals 2 damage to that player.” Player N, picks up the Paladin, reads it, puts it down, and says “Resolves”, and a moment later “And you take 2.” At which point I am called to the table.

    The Eidolon has a triggered ability that causes a change to the visible state of the game (namely life totals). By the definition of Triggered ability, the controller has to demonstrate awareness of the trigger when this game state change occurs. Since this particular trigger occurs when the spell is cast, that is the most appropriate time.

    I spent a moment on this one, because it seemed like one could count player N's “Resolves” comment as advancing past that moment. I, however was not comfortable drawing that particular line. For me personally, for the trigger to be missed, player N would have had to perform a more distinct game action (like try to resolve something else), or allowed the game to progress to a different phase or step. This had not happened, so I ruled that the trigger was NOT missed.

    This was a very line-y situation where I suspected highly that Player A would appeal my decision, and they did. After explaining the situation to HJ David Rappaport, he spoke to the players for a moment to confirm the details of the situation, then talked to me about my thought processes. In the end he opted to overturn my decision.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

WPN Events Oct - Nov

WPN October Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays; 7,14,21,28; 5:30-9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. 2pack­­s prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 3,10,24; :30-9:00pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. 2packs prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 17; 5:30-9:00pm.

    Game Day: Experience the power of play. NDC Butler to host a Magic Game day. This event is open to all players. Entry $10.00. 3packs prize pool per player. Standard constructed. Exclusive promos to be handed out to all participants and additional promos to be handed out to the top 8 finishers.
    Saturday: 18th 11:15am registration opens. 12:15pm start time.

    Grand Prix Trial (New Jersey): Format: Legacy. $20 entry. Competitive level event. Decklists required. Prize pool 6 packs per player. With 8-12 players, first and second may take singles instead of packs. With 13-15 players, this applies to 1-4th place. 16+ players this option becomes available to the entire top 8.
    Saturday 11th; 11:15am registration opens. 12:15pm start time.

    Kaijudo
    Kaijudo Duel Days: We are proud to offer more fun, and challenging events with Kaijudo, rise of the Duel Masters. Casual League runs concurrently to this slightly more organized tournament event. $5.00 entry w/ prize support.
    Tuesdays 7,14,21,28. 6-9pm

    Kaijudo Mega Bash: $20 Entry. 36 packs of current product for 1st place. Random prizes handed out each round. All other prizes based on attendance.
    Tuesday 28th, 5:00pm

    Dungeons & Dragons
    Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters.
    Mondays 1,13,20,27; 6-9pm.

WPN November Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 4,11,18,25. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 7,14. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. DCI sanctioned. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 21st. 5:30-9pm

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Here, you rule. Modern constructed event. This format includes cards from 8th edition and Mirrodin block forward. $10.00 Entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 28th. 5:30-9:00pm

    Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.

Expeditions: Continue to adventure. For Characters lv5+.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.