Thursday, November 6, 2014

WPN events Nov - Dec

WPN November Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 4,11,18,25. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 7,14. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. DCI sanctioned. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 21st. 5:30-9pm

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Here, you rule. Modern constructed event. This format includes cards from 8th edition and Mirrodin block forward. $10.00 Entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 28th. 5:30-9:00pm

    Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.

Expeditions: Continue to adventure. For Characters lv5+.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.

WPN December Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 2,9,16,30. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 5,12. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. DCI sanctioned. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 19th. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Here, you rule. Modern constructed event. This format includes cards from 8th edition and Mirrodin block forward. $10.00 Entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 26th. 5:30pm.

    Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 3,10,17,31; 6-9pm.

Monday, October 27, 2014

TCG Player Diamond (Columbus)

TCG Player Diamond (Columbus) Event Report
by Dan Regewitz Lv1 – Floor Judge (Deck Checks Team)

Cast:
Jarrod Williams Lv2 - Judge Manager
David Rappaport LV3 - Head Judge
Ryan Seymore UC - TO
Anthony Bucchioni Lv2 - Deck Checks Team Lead (mine)

    Reflecting on this past weekend, we had a pretty good event. 160 players were managed into a relatively smooth 8 rounds. The deck-check team, on which I served, checked 24 decks – before even the top 8 gathered. I'd like to do something a bit different with this judge article, and that is first, I'd like to retread some information about deckchecks, what they are and how we do them. Retread because I've covered this topic before as part of my tournament report for SCG open – Pittsburgh July 2011 (check the archives of my articles, it's in there).

    Deck checks

    So as part of my duties for this event, I was on the deck-checks team, and as luck would have it I remained on this team as was not pulled away from other duties as the day went on. Deck checks are a feature of nearly every major competitive magic event in modern memory. It is a task that we, as judges are expected to perform, and a task that requires some skill. Certainly there is learning involved as a judge may become faster or more efficient at this task.

    We perform deck checks primarily to ensure the integrity of the event. The deck list is a record of what deck any given player is playing in that event. Errors in said deck list can result in a potential for advantage when cards are registered incorrectly – or not at all.

    The Magic Tournament Rules (2.8) outline the expectations of what a deck check entails for players. The Infraction Procedure Guide (3.5) outlines the penalties for an improperly registered deck.

    However, there are many ins-and-outs of how to perform a deck check that are not recorded, except in judge articles. Performing a deck-check is largely a learn-by-doing exercise for judge canidates and new judges, and I will not attempt to cover everything that goes into the process. But here's a little of what to expect.

    There are essentially 2 types of deck checks. Targeted, and random. Random deck checks are just like they sound. A table # is generated at random, often by the scorekeeper, and the deck check team will swoop (slang for moving in and getting the decks at the right moment without alerting the players) the table.

    A targeted deck check occurs, when we encounter a potential error when checking the lists. This could be an unreadable card name or number, an abbreviated card name, a list without a name, or other minor clerical error. Often we investigate these issues by taking a look at the actual deck that the player is running. More often than not we make a note on the deck list as to the actual contents of the deck being run, and issue a penalty if we deem it necessary.

    The last time I discussed some of the details that go into actually swooping the decks, so this time around I'd like to cover the things that we look for when we check a deck for errors.

    The IPG specifically calls out the the following problems that could result in a deck-decklist error.
    The deck or decklist contains an illegal number of cards for the format.
    The deck or decklist contains one or more cards that are illegal for the format.
    A card listed on a decklist is not identified by its full name, and could be interepreted as more than one card. Truncated names of storyline characters (legendary permanents, planeswalkers) are acceptable as long as they are the only representation of that character in the format and are treated as referring to that card, even if other cards begin with the same name.
    The contents of the presented deck and sideboard do not match the decklist registered.

    We check for these things largely by sorting out the deck we obtained from the player, and comparing it to the list submitted at the start of the event.

    However it is important to note that these are not the only things that a member of the deck-check team may look for. Sometimes we also have to consider the possibility of marked cards. In a large event it is entirely possible for sleeves that are not marked to become somewhat marked during the event in the process of shuffling, cutting, playing, and otherwise manipulating cards. So a glance is usually given to sleeves to determine what kind of wear they have seen, and if a pattern can be determined.

    Scorekeeping 101
    Two interesting match results came to my attention during this tournament. Kudos to Lv2 Patrick Nelson.

    In one case, A player was seated and was waiting for his opponent to show up. The player meeting for the TCG-gold modern side event was announced, and the player wanted to go play modern. This resulted in a match where the player conceded to a no-show opponent, and then dropped to attend the other event. In the end we reported the match, and simply dropped both players.

    In another case, we had a table with a match slip and no players seated. That's right a double-tardiness match loss. In the end we reported this match as 0-0, and simply dropped both players.

    Missing Triggers
    Player A cast a Fiendslayer Paladin, while Player N has an Eidolon of the Great Revel on the battlefield. Eidolon reads in part “Whenever a player casts a spell with converted mana cost 3 or less, Eidolon of the Great Revel deals 2 damage to that player.” Player N, picks up the Paladin, reads it, puts it down, and says “Resolves”, and a moment later “And you take 2.” At which point I am called to the table.

    The Eidolon has a triggered ability that causes a change to the visible state of the game (namely life totals). By the definition of Triggered ability, the controller has to demonstrate awareness of the trigger when this game state change occurs. Since this particular trigger occurs when the spell is cast, that is the most appropriate time.

    I spent a moment on this one, because it seemed like one could count player N's “Resolves” comment as advancing past that moment. I, however was not comfortable drawing that particular line. For me personally, for the trigger to be missed, player N would have had to perform a more distinct game action (like try to resolve something else), or allowed the game to progress to a different phase or step. This had not happened, so I ruled that the trigger was NOT missed.

    This was a very line-y situation where I suspected highly that Player A would appeal my decision, and they did. After explaining the situation to HJ David Rappaport, he spoke to the players for a moment to confirm the details of the situation, then talked to me about my thought processes. In the end he opted to overturn my decision.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

WPN Events Oct - Nov

WPN October Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays; 7,14,21,28; 5:30-9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. 2pack­­s prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 3,10,24; :30-9:00pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. 2packs prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 17; 5:30-9:00pm.

    Game Day: Experience the power of play. NDC Butler to host a Magic Game day. This event is open to all players. Entry $10.00. 3packs prize pool per player. Standard constructed. Exclusive promos to be handed out to all participants and additional promos to be handed out to the top 8 finishers.
    Saturday: 18th 11:15am registration opens. 12:15pm start time.

    Grand Prix Trial (New Jersey): Format: Legacy. $20 entry. Competitive level event. Decklists required. Prize pool 6 packs per player. With 8-12 players, first and second may take singles instead of packs. With 13-15 players, this applies to 1-4th place. 16+ players this option becomes available to the entire top 8.
    Saturday 11th; 11:15am registration opens. 12:15pm start time.

    Kaijudo
    Kaijudo Duel Days: We are proud to offer more fun, and challenging events with Kaijudo, rise of the Duel Masters. Casual League runs concurrently to this slightly more organized tournament event. $5.00 entry w/ prize support.
    Tuesdays 7,14,21,28. 6-9pm

    Kaijudo Mega Bash: $20 Entry. 36 packs of current product for 1st place. Random prizes handed out each round. All other prizes based on attendance.
    Tuesday 28th, 5:00pm

    Dungeons & Dragons
    Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters.
    Mondays 1,13,20,27; 6-9pm.

WPN November Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Magic: The Gathering: Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 4,11,18,25. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 7,14. 5:30pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. DCI sanctioned. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 21st. 5:30-9pm

    Friday Night Magic - Modern: Here, you rule. Modern constructed event. This format includes cards from 8th edition and Mirrodin block forward. $10.00 Entry. DCI sanctioned w/ prize support! Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 28th. 5:30-9:00pm

    Dungeons & Dragons
Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters. For Characters lv1-4.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.

Expeditions: Continue to adventure. For Characters lv5+.
    Wednesdays 5,12,19,26; 6-9pm.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

WPN Events: Sept, Oct

WPN September Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Casual Play: Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays: 2,9,16,23,30th; 5:00-9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic: Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. 2 packs prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 5,12th. 5:30-9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic - 2 Headed Giant; Standard format. $10.00 entry.
3 packs prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 19th. 5:30-9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Khans of Trokir Launch event. Special 4 pack draft. $20 entry. Promos for all attendees. 2 packs prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday 26th. 5:30-9pm.

    Khans Prerelease: Come experience the newest set of Magic with this sanctioned sealed deck pre-release. Our first exposure to the Khans of Trokir. Once again NDC is proud to host an officially sanctioned pre-release event. Please note the times and prices below.
    Saturday, 20, 11:30 registration; 12:30 play begins. $30 sealed deck.
    Saturday, 20, 4:15 registration; 5:15 play begins. $30 sealed deck.
    Sunday, 21, 11:30 registraiton; 12:15 play begins. $30 2-headed giant sealed deck.

    Sealed Deck: Khans of Trokir Launch Event. Two Headed Giant Sealed deck (Using prerelease kits if product allows)! $25 entry. . Promos for all attendees. 2 packs prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Sunday, 28th 12:15-5pm.

    Kaijudo
    Kaijudo Duel Days: We are proud to offer more fun, and challenging events with Kaijudo, rise of the Duel Masters. Casual League runs concurrently to this slightly more organized tournament event. $5.00 entry w/ prize support. Hosted by Russel Young and Dan Regewitz.
    Saturdays 6,13,27; 5-9pm.

    Dungeons & Dragons
    Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters.
    Wednesday: 3,10,17,24th

WPN October Events
    Magic: The Gathering
    Casual Play: Here, you rule. Come to play, trade, or build decks for Magic: the Gathering. New Players Welcome. Also frequently run odd formats such as planechase, archenemy, commander, emperor, multiplayer, etc.
    Tuesdays; 7,14,21,28; 5:30-9:00pm

    Friday Night Magic: Here, you rule. Standard type 2 constructed event. $7.00 entry. 2pack­­s prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Fridays: 3,10,24; :30-9:00pm.

    Friday Night Magic - Draft: Join us for our monthly draft. $16.00 entry. 2packs prize pool per player. Hosted by Dan Regewitz.
    Friday: 17; 5:30-9:00pm.

    Game Day: Experience the power of play. NDC Butler to host a Magic Game day. This event is open to all players. Entry $10.00. 3packs prize pool per player. Standard constructed. Exclusive promos to be handed out to all participants and additional promos to be handed out to the top 8 finishers.
    Saturday: 18th 11:15am registration opens. 12:15pm start time.

    Grand Prix Trial (New Jersey): Format: Legacy. $20 entry. Competitive level event. Decklists required. Prize pool 6 packs per player. With 8-12 players, first and second may take singles instead of packs. With 13-15 players, this applies to 1-4th place. 16+ players this option becomes available to the entire top 8.
    Saturday 11th; 11:15am registration opens. 12:15pm start time.

    Kaijudo
    Kaijudo Duel Days: We are proud to offer more fun, and challenging events with Kaijudo, rise of the Duel Masters. Casual League runs concurrently to this slightly more organized tournament event. $5.00 entry w/ prize support.
    Saturdays 4,11,18,25; 5-9pm.

    Dungeons & Dragons
    Encounters: Come explore and adventure with Dungeons & Dragons - Encounters.
    Mondays 1,13,20,27; 6-9pm.

Monday, August 18, 2014

GPT Orlando - Tarentum; Head Judge Report

Grand Prix Trial Orlando – New Dimension Comics Mills (Tarentum, PA)
Head Judge Report

    Or how to run (or not) a Grand Prix Trial.

    This particular event represents my sixth or so Grand Prix Trial that I have had the fortune to judge in my years in the program. As such, I would like to not only cover some things that occurred in this event in a typical head judge report, but also write in broader strokes about what my fellow judges and Tournament Organizers can do to make these events run smoother.

    Preparation.
    These events take a certain amount of forethought and planning. To run a successful event the TO needs to make sure they have the space, and time to run the event. Provide for some lead time to advertise the event, secure the services of a certified judge such as myself, make sure they have a computer and printer that can be dedicated to the event. Assign someone (sometimes a judge, sometimes not) to keep score. Table numbers, paper cutter, water for parched players and staff – and probably a good number of items that I have failed to mention.

    The point is that as a TO, you need to think of the comfort of your players and staff. Absolutely anything you can do to make the day go smoother is probably a good thing. Jon (My TO on this event) gets a passing score in this department. His store recently underwent an expansion, and we had room for nearly 3 times the number of players we actually hosted (24). Drinks and snacks were on tap, we had a dedicated computer and printer in our room. At the end of the day I'd have to say we put on a successful event for everyone involved.

    I see part of my job as head judge to help the TO prepare. With new TO or ones I have not previously worked with, I try to make sure that they have considered all the things that go into these events. Because if something is forgotten or communication doesn't flow, it often creates a combination of delays or unneeded stress.

    Dealing with new Players.
    Grand Prix Trials are an interesting niche. They are relatively small events that occur on the store level, but they are Competitive Rules Enforcement Level. So you are often faced with players who are playing in their first competitive event. It becomes helpful then to make these events friendly to those players, while maintaining that competitive level. This is most easily done I've found through my Head Judge announcements. I discussed briefly:
    Today is Competitive REL – that simply means that we will hold you to more technically precise play.
    Outside assistance – If someone is involved in a tournament match, make sure that you do not say something that could be construed as play advice. By the same token, if you believe you see a rules issue, you can ask the players to pause the game, and get me involved right away!
    Sealed Deck Swap – You will receive 6 packs of M15. You will be opening these packs, and simply registering the contents of them with the checklists we just passed out. You will not be playing with the cards that you open.

    This is also true at least in part for the top-8 single elimination rounds. Many of your players may have never been in this situation before. It's good to have some instructions prepared for these players.
    Zone Draft – When passing packs, do not stack packs between players!
    Keep your eyes to yourself.
    Please do not discuss the draft in any way.
    You will have a chance to review your picks between packs.
    The rounds you are about to play are still best of 3 matches, the matches are untimed, but we still expect you to play at a reasonable pace.
    The rounds you are about to play are single -elimination rounds.

    Without mentioning names of course, I'm going to mention that we had one particular new player who I now know that this was probably his first ever magic event. As much as I rejoice to see anyone join this awesome hobby – this player is not the target audience for this event. I sincerely hope this player returns to this (or another store) to enjoy magic in the future, but I think allowing him to play at Competitive REL as his first event was probably a disservice.

    Penalties.
    Of course one of the things that is different at Competitive REL, is that we have a very well structured and defined system of penalties, defined by the IPG. And we had a few of those.

    That new player I mentioned before, the pool that he registered was done in a fashion that was rather incomplete and unclear. This was discovered by the player who received the pool at the start of the deck building process. This was also the moment when I became totally aware that this was in fact a brand new player. This falls under the Limited Procedure Violation penalty (warning).
    To resolve this issue, I worked with the player who received this pool. I assisted him in creating a more proper record of the pool.

    The real story was that during round 1, we found 1 deck list with an issue. And – you guessed it, it was this list. The player whom we had saddled with partial responsibility for recording this pool, had forgotten to record the basic land that he was playing. This falls under the deck/decklist problem penalty (Game Loss). However, I opted to downgrade this penalty to a warning for two potent reasons. First, that we had saddled this player with additional responsibility; second – I was collecting deck lists and double-checking them to see that the player had recorded their name and land – and somehow missed this one.

    The only other penalty on the day was another Limited Procedure Violation. This one occurred during our top 8 draft when a player who was between picks of pack 1, reviewed his picks thus far. It was quickly caught, and I re-clarified that review happens between packs only.

    Deck Checks
    All competitive level events also include some kind of deck list, and we judges are required to check at least some of them during the course of the event. The recommendation I often hear is that we want to try to check about 10% of the decks in the event. For this event of 24 people, I felt we could fill this basic requirement by checking a single match. I knew I wanted this check to occur sometime later in the event, preferably round 3 or 4 (of 5). I also knew that because we were a small crowd, and players were not required to play at their assigned tables (this was done so that we weren't boxed into one corner of an otherwise large room) – I was going to swoop into a game mid-round.

    Everything went according to plan here, except the check in question occurred in round 5 instead of round 3 or 4. While not ideal due to the fact that for several matches draws were declared, it accomplished our basic goals. I enlisted Jon's aid to check both decks in a timely fashion, and the decks were returned to the players without incident.

    Rulings
    Answering questions about rules and card interactions is one of many ways Judges serve the players. As this was a limited M15 event, there weren't many questions that stood out as particularly interesting. But I did take notes on 2 that I felt might be educational to some players.

    Generator Servant “T, Sacrifice Generator Servant: Add (2) to your mana pool. If that mana is spent on a creature spell, it gains haste until end of turn.
    Phyrexian Revoker “As Phyrexian Revoker enters the battlefield, name a nonland card.
Activated abilities of sources with the chosen name can't be activated.”

    If Phyrexian Revoker names Generator servant, than you may not sacrifice it for (2) mana. While this is a mana ability, Phyrexian Revoker doesn't care about this quality, and only cares that it is in fact an activated ability.

    Urborg, Tomb of Yogmoth “Each land is a Swamp in addition to its other land types.”
    Staff of the Death Magus “Whenever you cast a black spell or a Swamp enters the battlefield under your control, you gain 1 life.”

    Urborg's ability is static and continuously effects the game state. As such any land that you play or put into play will enter as a swamp, and trigger the staff of the Death Magus.
    As a side note, Urborg effects all land, and not just your own, so your opponent's land is also swamps if they happen to have a Staff of the Death Magus in play.

    Until next time, play some awesome magic.
- Dan Regewitz Lv1 Magic Judge